On 3 June 2019, the European Schoolnet Academy together with the University of Urbino launched a short MOOC with the aim of helping teachers to bring innovation to their classroom and provide them with the basic knowledge on how participate in the next edition of the EU Code Week. The course, supported by the European Commission, can be completed in only five hours, at any time between 3-26 June 2019.

The seventh edition of EU Code Week will take place 5-20 October 2019. Ahead of this, teachers, trainers and activity organisers will get a chance to use new training opportunities and learning resources to reach more schoolchildren in the EU and Western Balkans.

Online hate speech is a growing problem. Young people experience it frequently on social media, and it has been proven to affect their development. Education is part of the solution. For this reason, the SELMA project has launched a toolkit that offers comprehensive and hands-on solutions to approach the issue of online hate with young people aged 11-16.

Thanks to the first edition of the European Media Literacy Week, media literacy is on everyone's lips! So what can teachers do to boost their and their students' media literacy skills? One exciting thing to have on the radar is the Social Media Literacy for Change MOOC (massive open online course), taking place on 29 April until 12 June 2019. The MOOC aims to help European citizens in general and young people in particular, become active, creative and well-informed citizens of the digital world.

The SELMA project has recently published "Hacking Online Hate: Building an Evidence Base for Educators". This research report highlights how online hate plays a significant role in teenager's online media experience, while calling for a more pro-active awareness and education effort from all stakeholders. Initiatives to monitor or report online hate speech only scrape the surface of a broader culture of online hate. The problem must be addressed through a more holistic approach that takes into account the nature of online hate, its causes and consequences.

On Tuesday, 5 February 2019, the Safer Internet Day campaign turned 16 – and what a great day it was! Under the unifying slogan of "Together for a better internet", we called upon all stakeholders to join forces and bring their contribution to making the internet a safer and better place for all – especially for children and young people.

Young people from all over Europe are showing a growing appetite for coding activities, robotics and computational thinking, as the record participation in EU Code Week clearly reveals. The number of people taking part has grown from 10,000 to 2.7 million in just six years. The 2019 edition will take place from 5 to 20 October.

It's time for Safer Internet Day! As each year, the cornerstone of online safety events is set to take place in over 140 countries across the globe, on 5 February 2019, under the unifying slogan of "Together for a better internet".

The early school leaving phenomenon was examined in depth during the DIS-CODE project coming to an end in December. After two years of collaboration between teachers, students and organisations from Belgium, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Italy and Portugal, the policy recommendations are available for policy makers and other stakeholders. The project conducted research and workshops in order to define which innovative teaching methods would benefit students that face the risk of dropping out, or are in the need of assistance.

The DIS-CODE International Scratch Jam competition took place successfully on 7 December in the Future Classroom Lab of Brussels, where students from schools across Europe and beyond were awarded for their projects using Scratch.

Projects