The team at European Schoolnet is deeply saddened by the loss of so many lives today in the attacks which took place in Brussels. We would like to express our sincere condolences to the families and friends of the victims.

Making sure that all students can benefit from technologies in class is pertinent to the 21st century school. Especially when it comes to display systems it is important that all students in the class can see clearly the content displayed, particularly if they are sitting towards the back of the class or have a visual impairment.

Despite the European economic crisis, most countries in Europe continue to invest in the future by lending political and financial support to increasing students' interest in pursuing science careers, to improving their performance in related subjects at school, and to enhancing their motivation.

Life Science and STEM teachers are invited to join the 6th Distance Learning Activity "Testing Scientific Skills: Exploring a Protocol to Construct Exam Questions to Assess Scientific Skills" which will take place online between February 29th and March 4th 2016.

Press release: Brussels, 16 November 2015 For the past six years, the Scientix project has helped thousands of teachers of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects in schools across Europe to experiment in their classroom, adopt innovative teaching and learning methods, and inspire future generations of scientists.

The Scientix project has gone from strength to strength since its inception in 2010, involving thousands of professionals in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) education. From 16 to 20 November 2015, we will celebrate those achievements to date during the Scientix Week.

Press release - Brussels, 15 September 2015: The results of the 12.5 million Euro iTEC project, which piloted educational tools and resources in over 2500 classrooms across 20 European countries, are now available in a new book published by Springer International Publishing.

A very successful conference, organised as part of the Scientix project, put STEM education at the top of the discussion agenda. The outcomes of this event, which six hundred people attended, are now summarised in a new sixty-page publication.

Scientix launches the first of a series of video interview on the future of STEM. In the first video, Ewald Breunesse of Shell Nederland discusses the role that industry has to play in the promotion of STEM across Europe, and explains how industry can support STEM teachers.

A call for a STEM Alliance initiative - Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) are not as popular in Europe with school-age students as they once were. This is a worrying trend which has to change. Why? Because any future skills shortage in this area will affect both the economy and the individual worker.

Projects