In an attempt to mitigate the spread of the Coronavirus disease, 87% of world's student population, over a billion and a half young people, are unable to attend class because of nationwide school and university closures in 165 countries.

Research indicates that digital formative assessment (DFA) has great potential to support more powerful student learning, because it can provide for more opportunities for self-directed learning, interaction with peers, and for students to engage with complex problems in authentic learning environments.

While the past few decades have seen an improvement in the treatment of females in classroom methods and curricular materials, young girls still refrain from taking up an education in STEM fields because of reasons like lack of inspiration and role models, which is having a great impact in the presence of women in digital world.

Did you know that more than 40% of the estimated 6000 languages spoken in the world are in danger?

Today, 11th February 2020, we celebrate Safer Internet Day (SID) – the annual flagship campaign under the European Strategy for Better Internet for Children.

According to the European Commission, women represent only the 17% of ICT specialists and the 34% of STEM graduates. In the same way, UNESCO affirms that less than 30% of researchers worldwide are women.

During our annual conference EMINENT 2019, European Schoolnet has brought together in Warsaw, Poland, more than 140 participants from 33 countries: its network of Ministries of Education, the European Commission, educational stakeholders and industry partners to explore what is the European state-of-play of innovation at whole-school level.

On Thursday, 21 November 2019, the Safer Internet Forum (SIF) will take place in Brussels Belgium. With a theme of "From online violence to digital respect", it will also celebrate 20 years of safer/better internet funding by the European Commission.

Grant Hendrik Tonne, Minister of Education and Culture of Lower Saxony, Germany, visited European Schoolnet's Future Classroom Lab (FCL) early September, together with Christel Schröder and Nina Graf, from the Ministry of Education and Culture of Lower Saxony, and Corinna Robertson-Liersch, from the Representation of Lower Saxony in Brussels.

Published by European Schoolnet and supported by the Europeana Foundation, "Europeana Education - An initiative to integrate cultural heritage into classrooms" shares the common vision of Europeana and European Schoolnet on the role of cultural heritage in education.

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