The data that is presented in a new Scientix Observatory report shows that teachers of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) need more support, training and tools for implementing innovative pedagogies at schools. This report is based on an analysis of 3,780 responses from STEM teachers at secondary schools in 38 European countries to a survey carried out by Scientix, with the support of European Schoolnet and Texas Instruments, earlier this year.

The early school leaving phenomenon was examined in depth during the DIS-CODE project coming to an end in December. After two years of collaboration between teachers, students and organisations from Belgium, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Italy and Portugal, the policy recommendations are available for policy makers and other stakeholders. The project conducted research and workshops in order to define which innovative teaching methods would benefit students that face the risk of dropping out, or are in the need of assistance.

The DIS-CODE International Scratch Jam competition took place successfully on 7 December 2018 in the Future Classroom Lab of Brussels, where students from schools across Europe and beyond were awarded for their projects using Scratch.

Scientix has identified a number of challenges in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education and possible ways forward, published in a new Scientix Observatory report . Carried out with the support of Texas Instruments, this analysis is based on a consultation with Ministries of Education and industry and university representatives in fourteen European countries.

Serious games, that is games with an educational purpose, have become a popular tool for knowledge transfer, perceptual or cognitive change, but are they an effective instrument for behavioural change? eConfidence aimed to answer this question through research pilot actions in schools that tested the use of two serious games as a tool for positively impacting young people's behavioural changes.

Computational Thinking (CT) marks a new focus on learning programming as a new thinking skill that develops crucial 21st century skills such as logical thinking, problem-solving skills, creativity and collaborative and social skills. Programming is also increasingly recognised as one of the new skills needed for students to succeed in our digital society. European Schoolnet conducted a first study visit in Norway and Sweden aiming to learn from the two country examples about the purpose of teaching CT/programming, strategies to implement it and how to assess it. The new report 'Strategies to Include Computational Thinking in School Curricula' highlights the results of this visit.

The experts' seminar ‘'Evidence-based development of serious games for the educational sector'' took place in Brussels on 12 September, and it was jointly organised by European Schoolnet, the eConfidence and the Scientix projects.

Helmut Holter, the Education Minister of the German Land Thüringen, visited European Schoolnet last week, together with Bettina Biste, Director of the International German School in Brussels and Wolfgang Borde, Deputy Head of the Thuringian representation in Brussels.

Earlier this summer, the online safety support and accreditation service for schools eSafety Label launched a brand new portal. What novelties does this launch bring? Read on to find out!

Arts-based science education can contribute to address gender bias and stereotypes in educational and collaborative settings argues a new Scientix observatory paper on gender and innovation in Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics STE(A)M education.

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